Being a Reserve Officer with the Lake Lure Police Department

Reserve Officers Byron Haynes and Terry Frank are seen here.  The middle shooter is Fire Chief Ron Morgan, also a reserve officer, who qualifies and trains with LLPD to keep his certifications.  

You may not hear much about them, but local reserve police officers such as those pictured here serve an important role in supporting community police departments.

That's because they perform the same duties as a police officer on an as needed basis.

Reserve Officers Byron Haynes and Terry Frank are seen here.  The middle shooter is Fire Chief Ron Morgan, also a reserve officer, who qualifies and trains with LLPD to keep his certifications.

Reserve officers are an important part of a police department. That's because whenever an officer is sick or needs vacation time or when staffing levels are short, police departments like ours rely on reserve officers to fill in the gap

They also help to strengthen staff levels during events and large functions in the community. Most reserve officers have full time jobs but still make themselves available when needed. 

Sometimes, a reserve police officer is retired from a career in law enforcement who just wants to give back to their community on a part-time basis. Other times, people who are thinking of a career in law enforcement use this as an opportunity to find out whether they are suited to the job.

In this way, they are not required to invest as much training and educational time to a career they are not yet sure about. They do, however, have to participate in some police training in preparation to perform their duties as a reserve police officer.

In Lake Lure, reserve officers have provided key assistance during large public events and they have been particularly valuable during times of  staff shortages, inclement weather or turnover in the department.

Some of these officers have provided this assistance even while holding down a full-time job. Reserve officers for the LLPD are paid $15 an hour if they are asked to come in and work.

 Otherwise, they can work as much as they desire without pay.If an agency sponsors a candidate there may or may not be cost associated with school depending on the school itself. However, the candidate is always responsible for their own books and supplies.

For more information about becoming a reserve officer with the LLPD, send an email or call 828.625.4685